The Internet of Things

There are many explanations and definitions, but this one from a Forbes Magazine article is free of technical jargon and puts it into a social context.

"Simply put, this is the concept of basically connecting any device with an on and off switch to the Internet (and/or to each other). This includes everything from cellphones, coffee makers, washing machines, headphones, lamps, wearable devices and almost anything else you can think of.  This also applies to components of machines, for example a jet engine of an airplane or the drill of an oil rig. As I mentioned, if it has an on and off switch then chances are it can be a part of the IoT.  The analyst firm Gartner says that by 2020 there will be over 26 billion connected devices... That's a lot of connections (some even estimate this number to be much higher, over 100 billion).  The IoT is a giant network of connected "things" (which also includes people).  The relationship will be between people-people, people-things, and things-things."

At the end of this very approachable article there is this very wise conclusion.

"Conversations about the IoT are (and have been for several years) taking place all over the world as we seek to understand how this will impact our lives. We are also trying to understand what the many opportunities and challenges are going to be as more and more devices start to join the IoT. For now the best thing that we can do is educate ourselves about what the IoT is and the potential impacts that can be seen on how we work and live."

Sensors and control devices

On a broader scale, the IoT can be applied to things like transportation networks: "smart cities" which can help us reduce waste and improve efficiency for things such as energy use; this helping us understand and improve how we work and live. Take a look at the visual below to see what something like that can look like.

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Critical to the IoT and our Smart World are the sensors that transmit what they measure  over the internet to computers for analysis; and the control devices which respond accordingly.

The Kookaberry platform, together with its apps and peripherals can simulate many of the above scenarios very cheaply and effectively in a classroom.